• Taxes

    How to Get the Most Money Back on Your Tax Return

    Written By: David HesselFiduciary Financial Advisor in Brookfield Wisconsin

    Between gathering the necessary paperwork and working through complicated scenarios, tax season can be a stressful time. You’ve worked hard throughout the year, and you want to be sure you’re taking the right measures to get the maximum amount back on your return. Achieving this, however, takes diligence and research.

    5 Considerations to Make During Tax Season

    By taking a look at your whole financial picture, you’ll have a better idea of the actions you can take to minimize your tax obligation and maximize your return. While this can take some time, it’s worth thinking through all of your expenses in order to increase your potential to receive a sizeable tax return. Luckily, we’ve compiled a list of five key considerations to make when aiming to maximize your return.

    Consideration #1: Claim Your Retirement Tax Deduction

    You can make a contribution to your IRA (up to $6,000 if under 50 and $7,000 if 50 and older) up until the filing deadline to receive a tax deduction.1 If you are covered by a plan at work, you’ll be eligible for either a partial or full deduction depending on whether you’re filing separately, jointly or if you’re single or the head of the household. If not covered by work, you can claim a full deduction.2

    Consideration #2: Claim All Other Possible Deductions

    Many expenses can qualify as a deduction, meaning they can be claimed to help minimize the amount of taxable income. Common qualified expenses include charitable contributions and state and local income, sales and property taxes. However, there are a number of other deductions that all taxpayers should remember. This includes anything related to work education, including tuition, books, supplies, transportation and travel costs.3 If you needed to complete work to maintain a professional certification, for example, anything related to doing so may qualify. Other deductions relating to work include unordinary travel expenses or anything you spent on job-hunting to land the job you are currently in.

    Consideration #3: Make Sure to Claim All Dependents

    A dependent is not limited to children, as it could be a relative who lives in your home as a member of your household. For example, a relative who is not physically or mentally able to care for themselves. If the individual has an income of less than $4,200 and is not a dependent on another individual’s return, they may qualify as your dependent.4 Additionally, the person must be a U.S. citizen, U.S. alien or U.S. national.

    As of the Tax Cuts and Job Act changes in 2017, personal exemption deductions were suspended from 2018 until 2025. However, until then, you can still receive tax credits for children and dependents.5 You may receive up to $500 in tax credits for a qualifying dependent who is not a child of yours. However, this credit may be eliminated or reduced if your adjusted gross income exceeds $200,000 when filing alone or $400,000 when filing jointly.5

    Consideration #4: Consider Itemizing Deduction if You’re Able

    If the sum of your allowable deductions is higher than the standard amount, it’s recommended to itemize your deductions.6 In some cases, you’ll be able to get a bigger refund than taking the standard deduction. If you’re at the cusp of the standard amount, double-checking your receipts and expenses over the year may be an important step in determining whether or not to itemize your deductions. You can itemize deductions on expenses such as medical and dental care, mortgage interest, charitable giving and theft losses.6 However, in certain cases, you’ll be required to opt for one or the other. If you file a joint return with your spouse and you wish to itemize, for example, you and your spouse both must then itemize your deductions.

    Consideration #5: Claim Refundable Tax Credits

    Unlike a deduction that minimizes what you owe or a nonrefundable tax credit that only refunds up to what you owe, a refundable tax credit is money returned to you – such that even if you owe $0, you’ll be sent the remaining balance from the IRS. Refundable tax credits come in many forms. For example, credits may be given to those with expenses in a foreign country in order to avoid double taxation.7 You can also receive a credit when contributing to retirement savings, paying adoption fees or paying higher education expenses.

    If you’re dealing with a complex tax scenario, you can always lean on the assistance of a CPA. Reach out if you’re looking for trusted CPA recommendations. Filing for your taxes can feel like a daunting task, but taking the extra time and effort to make sure you’re taking full advantage of your tax return can pay off.

    Looking for more guidance on how to be financially stress-free? Schedule a 30-Minute Phone Call with David HesselFiduciary Financial Advisor in Brookfield Wisconsinhere or send him an email at dhessel@gvcaponline.com.

    You can find the original article here.

    1. https://www.irs.gov/retirement-plans/plan-participant-employee/retirement-topics-ira-contribution-limits
    2. https://www.irs.gov/retirement-plans/plan-participant-employee/2020-ira-contribution-and-deduction-limits-effect-of-modified-agi-on-deductible-contributions-if-you-are-covered-by-a-retirement-plan-at-work
    3. https://www.irs.gov/taxtopics/tc513
    4. https://www.irs.gov/publications/p503#en_US_2019_publink1000203270
    5. https://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/p5307.pdf
    6. https://apps.irs.gov/app/vita/content/globalmedia/4491_itemized_deductions.pdf
    7. https://www.irs.gov/individuals/international-taxpayers/foreign-tax-credit

    GVCM is an SEC Registered Investment Advisory firm, headquartered at N14W23833 Stone Ridge Drive, Suite 350, Waukesha, WI 53188. PH: 262.650.1030. David Hessel is an Investment Adviser Representative (“Adviser”) with GVCM. Additional information can be found at: https://www.adviserinfo.sec.gov/IAPD/Global View Capital Insurance, LTD. (GVCI) insurance services offered through ASH Brokerage and PKS Financial. David Hessel is an Insurance Agent of GVCI. Global View Capital Advisors, LTD is an affiliate of Global View Capital Management, LTD (GVCM). This content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information, and provided by Twenty Over Ten. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. The opinions expressed and material provided are for general information, and should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security.

  • The Market: 101

    How To Face The Fear of COVID-19

    Written By: Kaitlyn Duchien

    We know what you’re probably thinking. “Great. ANOTHER PSA about COVID-19. Just what I wanted to see.” We get it. At Face The Fear, we battled whether or not we should add another voice to the already overwhelming media noise bombarding you from every angle. But, we also felt it would be insensitive to go silent on an issue that is seriously impacting the lives of our audience on a physical, mental, emotional, and financial scale. So – if you’re sick of hearing more about COVID-19 – you have permission to close out of this article and move on with the rest of your day (no hard feelings). But – if you’re feeling anxious, overwhelmed, frustrated, or scared about everything happening in the world – stay here, friend. Let’s talk about it openly and share some ideas for how to take care of your body, mind, and wallet. 

    1. Let’s Get Physical (At Least 6 Feet Apart)

    Unless you’ve been living in complete isolation (oh wait – that’s what you’re supposed to be doing), you already know about what COVID-19 is, how to detect the symptoms, and what preventative measures you can take to keep yourself (and others) safe. In case you need a refresher, you can find all of the most current and factual information from the CDC here. Also, just a friendly reminder, we are all humans and must work as a collective unit to overcome an issue like this on a global scale. That means thinking about the wellbeing of others before yourself. If you have a strong, healthy immune system, take a moment to be grateful for that blessing! But, also acknowledge that this blessing comes with responsibility. While your body might have a supercharged defense system capable of attacking and defeating the virus, others are not so lucky and depend on you to help them stay healthy. Don’t take your health for granted. Show some love for others by washing your hands, cleaning your space, and maybe leaving behind a package of toilet paper for your neighbor? 

    2. It’s Making Me Mental

    If today’s news is making you feel like you’ve somehow landed on set of the next zombie apocalypse movie, you’re not alone. Words like “pandemic” and “quarantine” are scary, especially when the last time you heard them was while binge-watching The Walking Dead (no judgement – we’ve been there). Everyone processes information differently, and some may experience higher levels of mental and emotional stress than others. There is no right or wrong way to feel in response to the media messages you are receiving. However, chances are, you’ve experienced a negative impact on your lifestyle to some degree as a result of recent world events. With that said, it is just as important to take care of your emotional health as your physical health. Case in point: research has emerged revealing a correlation between negative emotional responses and lowered immunity. So, let’s take care of our mind and emotions so our body can take care of itself. Here are a few ways to give your mind and soul some TLC (all in the comfort of your own home):

    • Find a few new healthy recipes you’d like to try and get cooking! If you’re wanting to avoid the grocery store, try out a meal kit or grocery delivery service. I just received my first box from Imperfect Foods, a company that delivers high quality food deemed “not pretty enough” to be sold in most grocery stores. We received a week’s worth of groceries (including fresh fruits, veggies, meats, and fancy cheeses) all for $52. (P.S. Face The Fear is not sponsored by any food delivery service. We just genuinely like the companies linked above).
    • Plan a Facetime date with friends or family! Is there a friend or relative you haven’t chatted with in a while? Now is the perfect opportunity to catch up. Check in on loved ones, share your thoughts and feelings about current world events, and strengthen your support system. You can even get creative by watching a movie, playing a board game you both have at home, or sharing a meal “together” – all over video chat. Technology is a beautiful thing.
    • Have you been avoiding the gym because of all the people who never wipe down their machines after use? (You know who you are). Or maybe you’ve been wanting to save some money on a gym membership by starting an at-home workout routine? Here’s your motivation! Physical exercise will not only keep your immune system at the top of it’s game, but it will also provide your brain the endorphins it needs to combat stress. YouTube has millions of free at-home workout videos – from yoga, to strength training, to dance, to Jazzercize. Time to get your Jane Fonda on.
    • Unplug. Seriously. Turn off your phone, computer, and TV for an hour. Give your brain a break from the information overload that can so easily lead to emotional exhaustion. While it is important to stay informed about world events, too much information (especially inaccurate information) can be harmful to your overall wellbeing. Instead, use that hour to read a book, watch a movie, start a new project – anything that will completely remove you from the current media madness. 
    • If stress is severely impacting your ability to perform normal daily activities (such as eating, sleeping, and working), please reach out to a health care professional or contact the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services administration at 800-985-5990. 
    • We’d love to hear your creative ideas for how to take care of your emotional health at home. Share them in the comments below.

    3. Facing The Fear of Our Financial Future

    Along with all of the media coverage about COVID-19, you’ve probably heard that the stock market had a rough week last week. The S&P 500 dropped 20% from its recent peak, an official signal of a bear market. This is due to the uncertainty that comes with how COVID-19 will affect labor, supply chain, travel, safety, and multiple industries at large (think: cruise lines and hospitality). With the market on a roller-coaster ride, it can be easy to panic and want to pull any invested funds out of the market (such as money in your 401k or IRA). However, a correction is a natural part of the market cycle and actually provides a lot of potential benefits for long-term investors. If you’re reading this, there’s a good chance you’re a Millennial (or Gen Z) who’s got 40-50+ years until retirement. This means you have 40-50+ years to ride the market roller coaster and eventually retire with a significant return on your initial investment (averaging around a 10% annual return, looking back over the last 30 years. P.S. Past performance does not guarantee future results).  

    Side note: you might also be hearing that, currently, the stock market is “cheap,” meaning you can buy more stocks with less money. So, as a Millennial, this may be an excellent opportunity to think of increasing the percentage of your 401k or IRA contribution, or opening an investment account for the first time. Ultimately, if you buy into the market when prices are low, you’ll get more bang for your buck (one facet of dollar-cost averaging). Think about it this way: you have $100 to spend on toilet paper. Each roll costs $10, so you can buy 10 rolls. What happens when Walmart has a 50% off sale on toilet paper? Now, each roll only costs $5 and you can buy 20 rolls! (PSA: just because you can buy 20 rolls does not necessarily mean you should). Stocks function in a similar way. When the price of a stock decreases, you can buy more of them with the same amount of money and increase your potential for earnings if you’re willing to hold those stocks over a long period of time. (As always, when it comes to investing, make sure you work with a financial professional to help you achieve your specific financial goals). 

    For current information about COVID-19: please visit the CDC’s website here

    Got questions? Email us at facethefearfw@gmail.com.

    Don’t forget to leave a comment sharing how you’ve been taking care of yourself mentally, physically, and emotionally!

    And remember: WASH YOUR HANDS (not just during a pandemic). Society (and your mother) thanks you.


  • Insurance

    I Was A Caregiver For My Mom, But I’ll Never Ask My Son To Do The Same

    Original Article Written by Meredith Rainey on ScaryMommy.com

    She asked for a napkin to wipe the spaghetti sauce from her mouth, but all I had was a tissue, so I handed her that. She clumsily wiped her lips and cheeks, missing a few spots, and handed it back to me. She hardly ate at this point—she was so thin and weak, on painkillers, and had lost interest in food. I was happy to oblige when she surprised me by requesting a spaghetti dinner. She only ate about a dozen noodle strands, but it was something and she enjoyed it.

    Flashbacks of my mom’s battle with ovarian cancer sneak up on me, sometimes out of the blue, but more often when I’m in the trenches of daily life with my 11-year old son. As I fold his video-game themed t-shirts and sort his endless socks, I sometimes imagine him in my place, with a family of his own, worried about how he’ll care for me if I need it.

    I think about how I traveled to my parent’s house after a full day’s work at least three days a week (and on weekends) to give my poor dad a few hours of relief. After caring for my mom for more than two years, his skin was pale and his usual sparkling smile had dimmed. Even his posture was noticeably different; the gravity of being my mom’s full-time caregiver had weighed down his body, mind, and most importantly his heart.

    At this point, my mother was dependent on my father, brother, and me to help her with dressing, bathing, eating, and getting in and out of bed. My parents didn’t have any private insurance to cover such services, so we all pitched in. My brother and I had long since left the nest and were leading our own adult lives in different cities. Thankfully, we were still close enough to help ease my dad’s burden and be there for our mother as her long battle with ovarian cancer began to enter its final chapter.

    My father owned his own printing business for more than four decades. When my mom first got sick, he still worked full-time. As her condition worsened over the course of two years and he struggled to balance her needs, he made the difficult decision to sell his business and work for the buyers part-time. Eventually, he was forced to give up working entirely.

    The financial hit my parents took during this period was not nearly as damaging as the mental and emotional toll it took on my father. He was a very extroverted guy and work was one of his regular social outlets. When he gave that up and was home with my mom full-time, he in large part stopped being himself.  My mom didn’t want people to know she was sick, so that meant my dad didn’t have support outside of our immediate family. As for me and my brother, we struggled with balancing my mom’s care with full-time jobs and relationships, while managing the stress, sadness, and guilt that often goes along with having a loved one with a chronic health condition for which there is no easy fix.

    My story is not unique. According to the AARP Public Policy Institute, taking care of a loved one is a reality for more than 40 million Americans who provide an estimated value of $470 billion a year in unpaid caregiving services. Many of these people also fall into the “sandwich generation” and are squeezed between caring for both their parents and children at home. In fact, a recent survey from T. Rowe Price found that 35 percent of parents with 8- to 14-year-old kids are also caring for an aging family member. Imagine having to ensure 24-hour care for a loved one while working and maintaining all of your regular parenting duties. It’s a lot to expect of anyone.

    While being able to provide care is in some ways a blessing and most are happy to do it, it’s not easy. The physical and emotional burden of caregiving is somewhat obvious, but it also has a financial impact. According to the same AARP study, family caregivers over the age of 50 who leave the workforce to care for a parent incur average income and benefit losses of more than $300,000.

    As I reflect on my own experiences with family caregiving, I shudder to think about my son being in my shoes one day. While I know he’d willingly do whatever might be needed for his dear old mom, it’s not a responsibility I want him to bear, especially not alone. I’d rather he have the luxury of being able to manage my care rather than having to provide it himself.

    I’m fortunate to work for a company that has taught me the value of creating a plan and exposed me to the many options that exist to help make caregiving a little easier on those who provide it. I’ve learned that planning ahead and evaluating options to cover some of the cost of future care can not only ease the burden on family members, but also help protect retirement savings by providing a dedicated source of funds to cover care costs. I also know that thinking about and planning for these things now, while I’m young and healthy, will give me and my family more options at a lower cost than if we put it off and hope that we never have to deal with it.

    If there was any blessing in my family’s caregiving experience, it was that my mom was able to spend her last days in the place she felt most comfortable—at home. I didn’t know it at the time, but that night I served her spaghetti was the last night I saw her alive. As I walked out of my parent’s bedroom at the end of that visit, my mom told me something that I have carried with me ever since. Her last gift to me was to share her philosophy and an indication of her faith despite knowing she was very short on time. She said, “Meredith, kick your feet up and don’t worry about a thing. I love you.” I love you too mom. So much.

    Original Article Written by Meredith Rainey on ScaryMommy.com

  • Credit Cards

    How Do Credit Cards Work?

    **This article has been edited for Face The Fear’s website. Original Article written by Kelly Dilworth at CreditCards.com

    Summary

    When used responsibly, a credit card can help you finance new purchases, shop securely or earn rewards in exchange for spending. But with high APRs and a range of fees, they can also be risky. Here’s a closer look at modern credit cards and what you need to know about them.

    Some loans – such as purchases you make on a charge card – are expected to be repaid quickly. For example, a charge card requires you to pay off your purchases in full when you receive your monthly bill.

    Other loans, such as credit cards, give you more time to pay off your purchases and only require you to pay a minimum amount each month. In exchange for allowing you to carry over your debt from month-to-month, your credit card will charge you interest.

    The amount of interest you’re charged will depend on the card you choose and your credit history. For example, travel cards tend to charge higher amounts of interest. So do cards that are designed for consumers with low credit scores.

    Unlike charge cards and installment loans, credit cards give you a revolving line of credit (often called your credit limit) that allows you to borrow up to a certain amount.

    For example, if you have a $5,000 credit limit, you’ll be allowed to charge any amount you want, up to that $5,000 limit. However, you won’t be able to charge any more than $5,000 until you’ve paid down your balance or have been given a credit limit increase.

    Common credit card charges

    Most credit cards charge a wide range of fees. However, the fees are typically tied to optional services, such as balance transfers, cash advances and revolving balances. As a result, you may not have to pay any fees at all if you use a no annual fee credit card, pay off your purchases in full each month and only use your card to make new purchases.

    Here are some common charges you might encounter on your credit card:

    • Standard APR: Your annual percentage rate (APR) determines the amount of interest you’ll be expected to pay if you carry a balance from one month to the next. Most credit cards are variable-rate credit cards, meaning their APRs are tied to a benchmark interest rate called the prime rate. However, some cards are fixed-rate credit cards and so their APRs are unaffected by the prime rate.
    • Balance Transfer APR: If you transfer an old balance to your new credit card, your balance transfer APR will determine how much interest you’re charged on your transferred balance.
    • Cash Advance APR: If you borrow cash from your credit card – for example, by writing a credit card check or taking out cash from an ATM – you’ll be charged a special cash advance APR that’s often significantly higher than your regular APR.
    • Penalty APR: Your credit card issuer may also charge a higher APR, called a penalty APR, if you fall behind on payments. 
    • Annual fee: Some credit cards charge a fee just for owning the card. For example, if you open a rewards card with extra generous benefits or get a secured card for consumers with bad credit, you may be charged an annual fee.
    • Balance transfer fee: If you transfer debt onto your new credit card, your card issuer may charge you a percentage of the total amount you transferred. Balance transfer cards usually charge a fee of $5-10 or 3-5% of the transferred balance.
    • Cash advance fee: Your card issuer will also charge you a percentage of the amount you borrowed if you take out a cash advance.
    • Foreign transaction fee: Some credit card issuers also charge a percentage of any transaction that you make abroad or in a foreign currency. Foreign transaction fees tend to be 3% of the purchase. If you’re going to be traveling overseas, a card with no foreign transaction fees can help you save.
    • Late payment fee: Your credit card issuer may also charge you a fee each time you pay your bill after your payment due date. Under federal law, a late payment fee can’t exceed $40.

    See related:  Picking the right credit card

    Credit card benefits and promotions

    Many card issuers also add special promotions and benefits to their credit cards in order to attract new customers and encourage existing cardholders to continue using their cards. As a result, your card may offer:

    • An introductory APR: Some credit cards offer new cardholders a low or 0% APR on new purchases for a set period. For example, a card may offer to temporarily waive interest for a year or more.
    • An introductory balance transfer APR: Some credit cards also offer a promotional interest rate on balances you transferred from other loans or cards. For example, you may be given a year or more to pay off the transferred balance before you’re charged any interest.
    • Fee waivers: To attract customers, some credit cards waive common fees, such as balance transfer fees or foreign transaction fees.
    • Rewards: Many cards also offer a rewards program. For example, you may be offered cash back, points or travel miles in exchange for using your credit card.
    • Sign-up bonuses: Some credit cards also offer a one-time rewards or cash back bonus when you first sign up for a credit card. They often require you to spend a certain amount in a set time period in order to receive the bonus.
    • Ongoing bonuses: A credit card may also offer other kinds of bonuses throughout the year. Depending on the card, you may receive a bonus when you redeem your rewards or when you spend a certain amount.
    • Credit card benefits: In addition, many credit cards offer purchase protection and travel insurance benefits, such as extended warranty, car rental insurance and travel accident insurance. Most cards also offer zero liability fraud protection, so you don’t have to worry about losing money if your card information is stolen.
    • Additional card perks: Some rewards cards with annual fees also offer other credit card benefits, such as travel credits, airport lounge access and more.

    Federal protections

    Credit cards are also subject to a number of consumer protection laws, including:

    • The Credit CARD Act of 2009: This law offers a number of protections for consumers, including protection from sudden rate increases and excessive fees.
    • The Fair Credit Billing Act: Among other protections, this law gives consumers the right to dispute fraudulent or inaccurate charges.
    • The Fair Credit Reporting Act: This law gives consumers the right to access their credit reports once per year from each of the three credit bureaus – Equifax, Experian and TransUnion – for free through AnnualCreditReport.com and dispute errors on their reports.

    See related:  8 things you must know about credit card debt

    How to get a credit card

    You’ll need an established credit history, with a track record of on-time payments, in order to qualify for most credit cards. However, some credit cards are easier to get – even if you’ve never used credit before.

    Secured credit cards are designed to help cardholders build a positive credit history. In exchange for a refundable deposit to help secure the loan, you’ll be given a card that you can use to make a limited number of purchases. Over time, you’ll build a positive credit history by making on-time payments.

    Once you’ve built up a track record of using credit responsibly, you’ll eventually be able to qualify for other cards – including cards that offer rewards and other benefits.

    Kelly Dilworth is a former staff reporter at CreditCards.com. She began her career in journalism at The Atlantic in 2007, then detoured into nonfiction book publishing for several years. She returned to journalism in 2010 and since then has written about everything from 20-somethings with Herculean credit scores to the Federal Reserve’s monetary policy decisions.

  • Videos,  Wedding

    Wedding Planning 101: Tips & Tricks to Slay your Special Day

    Join me (Kaitlyn) on the journey to planning our wedding! In this video, I share a few of the tips & tricks I’ve learned so far about how to find the best deals, reduce stress, and save time. Don’t forget to like & subscribe! Leave a comment down below if you want to see a part 2!

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    Podcast: Face the Fear (on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify, and Google Play)

    Contact Us: facethefearfw@gmail.com

  • Retirement Planning

    Market Drop? Think Long Term!

    We have visited the topic of thinking long term when it comes to your investments and adding to your 401(k) on the podcast. (Haven’t listened to our podcast yet? Check it out here, or on your favorite podcast streaming app/website!)

    Check out this article that we found on NerdWallet that gives some steps on how to help protect your 401(k), IRA and other retirement accounts.

    Happy Wednesday!

  • Budgeting

    How to Talk to Your Kids About Money

    Written By: David Hessel, Fiduciary Financial Advisor in Brookfield Wisconsin

    Opening up and starting conversations about how to handle money and finances with your kids may seem overwhelming, but it doesn’t have to be.

    As a parent, it is your role to serve as a positive influence in their lives to get them on the right financial track. Here are five things to consider as you embark on helping your children understand the importance of being responsible with their finances. 

    Start Simply, When They Are Young

    Start discussing money with even the littlest ones by including by including them in everyday activities, such as grocery shopping or budgeting. This allows money to become a tangible concept and not some abstract thing that they cannot see. You can also ask them questions such as “We have 5 dollars to buy a treat, would you pick gelato or cookies?”.  These types of conversations help children to understand that their are trade-offs to any decision, and that money is not infinite.

    Be Truthful  

    Being honest with your kids is a great first step to opening the door to discussing finances. You can share the family budget for items like groceries or entertainment, and explain remind them of this limit when they ask for items that don’t fit within it.

    Additionally, if there are things in your financial past, such as going into debt, that you are not proud of, share that with your kids. Honest moments with your kids are very valuable and will help build trust. Keep in mind that the more open and honest you are with your kids, the more open they will be with you, so being truthful about your own finances is a great place to start. 

    Talk About Values 

    Encourage your kids to consider what is important to them for their future. Start by asking questions such as “Do you want to own a house or rent when you grow up? or “What splurges would you like to be able to make when you grow up (travel, cars, etc)?”.

    Helping kids to visualize what they want for the future is a crucial component to talking to kids about money and financial goals. Talking about what they value and hope to have in their future allows them to take a long-term view, which is critical to the concepts of saving, budgeting, and paying down debts.

    Establish Family Goals 

    As a family, talk about your budgeting methods and set specific goals together. For instance, perhaps you set a weekly grocery limit of $150. Take your children to the store with you when you shop and have them help look for sales or clip coupons to keep your cart under budget. Involving your children however you can with the family finances is a great hands-on way to educate them and give them a chance to see real-life examples of how their financial habits will impact them in the future. 

    Lead By Example 

    There may be certain financial topics that you are not as knowledgeable about, and that’s okay! Take the opportunity to learn with your kids. Showing your kids that you are interested in growing your understanding of financial topics will heighten their interest in it as well. 

    Talking to your kids about money may seem like a daunting conversation to have if you don’t know how to approach it properly. However, broaching the subject sooner rather than later will reap many benefits for you and your kids. Ultimately, you want your kids to have the knowledge and skills they need to handle their own finances responsibly as they grow up. As a parent, it’s your job to instill this knowledge in them and to open the door to an often taboo subject so that you can help them get off on the right foot with their finances. Financial habits are formed young, so it’s critical that you start early and start the conversation today. Make your kids feel comfortable to talk about finances with you by using these tips. 

    Looking for more guidance on how to be financially stress-free? Schedule a 30-Minute Phone Call with David Hessel, Fiduciary Financial Advisor in Brookfield Wisconsin, here or send him an email at dhessel@gvcaponline.com.

    You can find the original article here.

    GVCM is an SEC Registered Investment Advisory firm, headquartered at N14W23833 Stone Ridge Drive, Suite 350, Waukesha, WI 53188. PH: 262.650.1030. David Hessel is an Investment Adviser Representative (“Adviser”) with GVCM. Additional information can be found at: https://www.adviserinfo.sec.gov/IAPD/Global View Capital Insurance, LTD. (GVCI) insurance services offered through ASH Brokerage and PKS Financial. David Hessel is an Insurance Agent of GVCI. Global View Capital Advisors, LTD is an affiliate of Global View Capital Management, LTD (GVCM). This content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information, and provided by Twenty Over Ten. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. The opinions expressed and material provided are for general information, and should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security.

  • Podcast

    Face The Fear Podcast – Pete The Planner!

    Peter Dunn

    Join us as we discuss all things finances with the famous Pete The Planner! He has written 10 books, has his own podcast (Million Dollar Plan), radio show (Pete the Planner® Radio Show on WIBC), appears on TV and regularly writes newspaper columns. See his contact information below to connect with him and see all that he has accomplished, which is a lot! 

    Peter Dunn:

    Face The Fear: 

  • Budgeting

    Finances: The No. 1 Reason Americans are More Anxious Than Ever Before (+ How to Manage it)

    Written By: David Hessel, Fiduciary Financial Advisor in Brookfield Wisconsin

    As we get older, more and more expenses end up on our plate. From mortgages to car repairs, it can feel like there are endless bills to pay. And as we all know, with more bills, comes more pressure, anxiety and stress. In fact, the American Psychological Association found that money is Americans’ number one stressor.1 Finances have remained at the top of the list since the survey began in 2007.2

    When it comes to stress, the numbers don’t lie. The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences conducted a study that evaluated heart health changes before, during and after a recent financial crisis and found that during the recession, both blood pressure and blood glucose levels increased in respondents, signaling a worsening in heart health.3

    While many of us dream of being financially secure, most of us can agree that traditional education in our public schools does not properly equip us with the knowledge and resources necessary to be effective financial decision-makers. There seems to be a growing gap between financial literacy and our population, causing many people to lose hope and get trapped in a deeper hole of debt.

    However, when it comes to money, there are four ways you can more effectively manage your finances so you remain in control of your spending habits.

    Tip #1: Automate Your Savings

    It can be difficult to set aside money every month, especially after you’ve been anxiously awaiting to get your paycheck. If you’re someone who struggles with putting money away, consider setting up an automatic transfer from your checking account to your savings account each month to make sure that no matter what, you’re continuously growing your nest egg. Whether you want to be prepared for any emergencies that may come up or have a dream of buying a house one day, adding money to your savings account every month — even if it’s only $100 — can get you closer to the financial stability you need to feel confident about your future.

    Tip #2: Stay Away from Impulse Purchases

    With so many products out there — ranging from new gadgets to the latest ‘must-have’ accessories — it can be difficult to put a cap on your spending habits. Instead of putting yourself right in front of your guilty pleasures, consider putting your money towards experiences, rather than material items. If your favorite past-time is going to the mall, swap window shopping with a picnic out in the park or a day out at your local museum (some museums offer discounted prices over the weekend). While retail therapy may seem like the solution to your problems, oftentimes, you end up feeling worse than if you had spent your time making memories instead. With these memories, your craving for consumerism may gradually die down, leaving you with more time to enjoy the simple pleasures in life.

    Tip #3: Focus on What You Can Control

    While it’s difficult to effectively plan ahead for every single expense we’re going to have, you can at least have an initial game plan for where your money is going to go. Theoretically, every month, you know you’re going to have to pay rent or a mortgage, buy groceries, pay other utility bills and fill up on gas a few times. So, after you get your paycheck, subtract all of these expenses from your total amount. This will give you a clear idea of how much “fun” money you have to spend each month. And, if you plan to put some money into your savings account, you’ll want to make a note of that too.

    The purpose of this exercise is to make yourself more mindful of the money you’re spending each month. When you know — without a doubt — certain specific expenses are going to come up, you can start planning ahead to make sure you’re not spending more money than you have.

    Tip #4: Be More Goal-Oriented

    For some people, the thought of having a goal can be terrifying as it means there is a chance they might fail. However, if you never set goals for yourself, you’ll never have complete control over your financial life. To get started, begin with a realistic goal that can ideally be achieved in less than five years, such as paying off your credit card debt. Once you’ve identified what you want to accomplish, write it down.

    Oftentimes, the simple act of writing down your goals can make it feel more real, therefore making you more accountable. Next, create a rough timetable of how you are going to achieve your objectives. This timetable could include information such as how much money you’re going to save every month, as well as milestones for each payment you’re going to make. Over time, you’ll begin to gain more confidence about your finances, in turn leaving you feeling more in control — and capable — of managing your money on your own.

    Looking for more guidance on how to be financially stress-free? Schedule a 30-Minute Phone Call with David Hessel here or send him an email at dhessel@gvcaponline.com.

    You can find the original article here.

    1. https://www.apa.org/news/press/releases/2015/02/money-stress
    2. https://www.marketwatch.com/story/one-big-reason-americans-are-so-stressed-and-unhealthy-2018-10-11
    3. https://www.pnas.org/content/115/13/3296

    GVCM is an SEC Registered Investment Advisory firm, headquartered at N14W23833 Stone Ridge Drive, Suite 350, Waukesha, WI 53188. PH: 262.650.1030. David Hessel is an Investment Adviser Representative (“Adviser”) with GVCM. Additional information can be found at: https://www.adviserinfo.sec.gov/IAPD/Global View Capital Insurance, LTD. (GVCI) insurance services offered through ASH Brokerage and PKS Financial. David Hessel is an Insurance Agent of GVCI. Global View Capital Advisors, LTD is an affiliate of Global View Capital Management, LTD (GVCM). This content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information, and provided by Twenty Over Ten. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. The opinions expressed and material provided are for general information, and should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security.

  • Wedding

    The Perfect Dress

    Ladies, we know wedding dress shopping can be an amazing and fun time where you get to try on extravagant, beautiful dresses that make you feel confident and beautiful as you walk down the aisle to your future spouse, who is crying tears of pure joy. However, the price tag on these dresses may make you cry tears of pure stress.

    Season 4 Drinking GIF by Friends - Find & Share on GIPHY

    According to the Huff Post, American brides spend an average of $1,289 for their wedding dress – that’s a lot of dough.

    If you are on a budget, there are options to get the dress of your dreams while not breaking the bank and I have composed a list of a few:

    • Attend a Bridal Show: Often times when you attend a bridal show, dress shops will give discounts just for setting up an appointment to shop and try on dresses. This is a great way to begin planning a date to shop for dresses, and if you find “the one,” you already have a sweet discount waiting for you.
    • Sample Dresses: Say you find that one perfect dress, but it is WAY over your budget. Some bridal shops will hold sales to buy sample dresses and floor models, so you can get that dress for a discounted price. You can also look online and, if you know the style and fit you want, there are a ton of sites that offer sample sales.
    • Go With a Less Traditional Color: This option is not for everyone. But if you are not stuck on a white wedding dress, picking a different color could be a great option. These are less common, so it is easier to find at a lower price.  
    • White Bridesmaids Dress: If simple is more your style, choosing a white bridesmaid dress could save you a lot of money. Still beautiful, still elegant, and no one will know the difference!
    • Reuse and Upcycle: Typically, you only wear your wedding dress one time. Why not buy it second-hand? Doing this will give you an amazing dress, still in good quality, but for a fraction of the price. And if there are things you don’t like or want to change to make it perfect, you can find a seamstress to fix it to your liking (within their ability). This option allows you to customize your dress while keeping money in the bank.
    •   Rent, Don’t Buy: Realistically, you are going to wear your wedding dress one time. If you don’t plan to keep it, consider renting. This is a great way to not only save money, but now you also don’t have to keep the dress tucked away in your closet taking up space.

    These are just a few ways you can save money shopping for a wedding dress. While this can be a big expense, it doesn’t have to be overwhelming and stressful. There are so many ways to save money for the perfect dress. If you have any additional recommendations, leave a comment below! We would love to share your ideas to help a fellow bride.

    Written By: Dakota Otis